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How To Stay Safe as a Property Manager

Property managers stay safe by making a conscious effort to look out for the safety of their properties and tenants, but they don't always actively think about their own safety. Here are property manager safety tips that they should follow.

 

How to Stay Safe as a Property Manager

Property managers care for the safety of so many others on a daily basis that it’s often difficult for them to sit back and reflect on the ways that their job can pose potential danger and harm to themselves. However, your own safety is your most basic need, and it should never be overlooked or forgotten, even while on the job. With some precaution, you can reduce or even eliminate risks to yourself, to others, and to the property itself.

Always be aware of your surroundings and of those around you. In addition, keep this checklist handy, especially when showing the property to strangers:

Always meet at the office.

Whenever possible, make sure the tenant or prospect meets you on your turf, especially when you know that a tenant has a complaint or sounds angry.

Trust your gut.

If a stranger appears to be, well, strange, you may want to not go ahead with showing the property or tangling with them for an extended period of time. If you don’t get a good feeling, trust yourself. Your instincts are usually correct. Having emergency help phones in multiple areas on the property can be a crime deterrent and provides a reliable way to summon help when unexpected or unwelcome guests arrive.

Learn the five key elements of property safety with this free guide >>

Keep in touch.

When leaving the office with a tenant or prospect, always let your staff, or a trusted colleague, know where you are and when you will be back. Schedule a time for them to call or text you to check up on you (remember to answer them!). Touch base with them regularly. Identify any means of contact in the event of an emergency along the way.

Post a tracking board in the office.

List the date, your name, the tenant or prospect’s name, your destination, contact info (phone number, email) and expected return time.

Create an office distress code.

Like a strong password, have the staff agree on a code or phrase that immediately indicates that you are in trouble and that emergency help should be contacted. Example: “No, I don’t think that Unit 2E is available next month.”

Show properties during the daytime only.

Always make a copy of a potential tenant’s identification. Make sure the shades, blinds and curtains are always open. If you must show a property at dusk or after dark, make sure your staff is aware of where you are (and when), and be sure to turn on all the lights as you walk through.

Get tips and templates for building your property Emergency Action Plan with this free guide >>

Learn self-defense.

Find a highly recommended self-defense class in your area. Your gym often has them, as do community centers. However, if a situation escalates during a property showing, you should do everything that you can to get out of the situation rather than to provoke a fight.

Never announce that a property is vacant.

This could be seen as an invitation to criminals.

Keep your emergency contact information constantly updated.

Always have the most up-to-date contact information for your emergency call list. Our account information update form lets you take care of this ahead of time.

Peace of mind is often hard to come by for a property manager, but taking precautions can make all the difference. Follow these steps and protect yourself, your staff, your tenants and your property. Always remember that emergency communications are also for the benefit and safety of property managers too.

To learn more about how Kings III can increase the safety and value of your facility, visit www.kingsiii.com.

Building Your Emergency Action Plan

 

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