BLOG CATEGORIES

How To Stay Safe as a Property Manager

How To Stay Safe as a Property Manager

Property managers stay safe by making a conscious effort to look out for the safety of their properties and tenants, but they don’t always actively think about their own safety. Here are property manager safety tips that they should follow.

Property managers care for the safety of so many others on a daily basis that it’s often difficult for them to sit back and reflect on the ways that their job can pose potential danger and harm to themselves. However, your own safety is your most basic need, and it should never be overlooked or forgotten, even while on the job. With some precaution, you can reduce or even eliminate risks to yourself, to others, and to the property itself.

Find out how to improve safety and reduce costs at your property

Our best-in-class emergency phone + monitoring solutions provide peace of mind and are backed by decades of expertise

Learn More

Always be aware of your surroundings and of those around you. In addition, keep this checklist handy, especially when showing the property to strangers:

Always meet at the office.

Whenever possible, make sure the tenant or prospect meets you on your turf, especially when you know that a tenant has a complaint or sounds angry.

Trust your gut.

If a stranger appears to be, well, strange, you may want to not go ahead with showing the property or tangling with them for an extended period of time. If you don’t get a good feeling, trust yourself. Your instincts are usually correct. Having emergency help phones in multiple areas on the property can be a crime deterrent and provides a reliable way to summon help when unexpected or unwelcome guests arrive.

Learn the five key elements of property safety with this free guide >>

Keep in touch.

When leaving the office with a tenant or prospect, always let your staff, or a trusted colleague, know where you are and when you will be back. Schedule a time for them to call or text you to check up on you (remember to answer them!). Touch base with them regularly. Identify any means of contact in the event of an emergency along the way.

Post a tracking board in the office.

List the date, your name, the tenant or prospect’s name, your destination, contact info (phone number, email) and expected return time.

Create an office distress code.

Like a strong password, have the staff agree on a code or phrase that immediately indicates that you are in trouble and that emergency help should be contacted. Example: “No, I don’t think that Unit 2E is available next month.”

Show properties during the daytime only.

Always make a copy of a potential tenant’s identification. Make sure the shades, blinds and curtains are always open. If you must show a property at dusk or after dark, make sure your staff is aware of where you are (and when), and be sure to turn on all the lights as you walk through.

Get tips and templates for building your property Emergency Action Plan with this free guide >>

Learn self-defense.

Find a highly recommended self-defense class in your area. Your gym often has them, as do community centers. However, if a situation escalates during a property showing, you should do everything that you can to get out of the situation rather than to provoke a fight.

Never announce that a property is vacant.

This could be seen as an invitation to criminals.

Keep your emergency contact information constantly updated.

Always have the most up-to-date contact information for your emergency call list. Our account information update form lets you take care of this ahead of time.

Peace of mind is often hard to come by for a property manager, but taking precautions can make all the difference. Follow these steps and protect yourself, your staff, your tenants and your property. Always remember that emergency communications are also for the benefit and safety of property managers too.

To learn more about how Kings III can increase the safety and value of your facility, visit www.kingsiii.com.

Building Your Emergency Action Plan

KEEP LEARNING

How to Handle After-Hours Emergencies

Not all on-site emergencies take place during regular working hours, but that doesn't make them any less important to address. Here's how property managers can effectively respond to property emergencies occurring after-hours without an unrealistic, burdensome workload.

The 5 Most Common Reasons Smartphones Fail at Property Safety

If you rely on tenants' smartphone use as an on-site emergency response, you're opening up some liability issues when it comes to property safety. Here's what you need to know.

Prepare an Emergency Plan for Your Fitness Center

Because your fitness center could be one of the more popular amenities on your property, it certainly brings a need for a plan to manage risks that can occur. If you haven’t already, it’s important to establish life safety and emergency response practices specifically designated for the area. Here are some of the essentials.

Elevator Communications and Data Connection Requirements: Properly Evaluating Security Risk, Reliability and Encumbrances

There’s a lot to consider when thinking about the new elevator emergency communication code requirements. Deciding to use your own network creates a long checklist and more work for you. Granting a third party vendor access to your network is an option but has risks. Here are a few things to consider when making your decision.

Check Your Property Crime Stats for 2021

As part of Building Safety Month, we’re taking a look at some fundamental property crime statistics that all property managers should know, adding in some of our own crime prevention and crime response tips.

The Downfalls of Using a Deactivated Cell Phone for Your Emergency Pool Phone

We have found as an emergency pool phone provider that there are multifamily communities unaware that their current pool phone service is actually using a deactivated cell phone. Depending on the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ), this often does not pass inspection for several reasons. This puts both property managers and their tenants at risk. Learn why.  

Kings III Expands Emergency Monitoring Benefit via FirstNet Network: What You Should Know

Kings III equipment has been approved for the use of FirstNet, built by AT&T, which is a long-term evolution (LTE) network that gives first priority to first responders and other public safety personnel. Learn more here.

Kings III Emergency Communications’ M90 Phone is Now FirstNet Ready®

After a rigorous review process, Kings III’s emergency phone host control panel, the M90, is now FirstNet Ready™ and ready for use on FirstNet®, a public safety network. Learn items of note.

Recent Winter Storms Highlight Need to Plan for All Contingencies in an Emergency

See how Kings III's emergency dispatch center was able to run as-usual during the mass Texas power outages and how we're prepared to do so in any outage.

Kings III makes it easy as a single point-of-contact for all your emergency response needs. With expertise in line connectivity, compliance codes, equipment maintenance and safety protocol, we offer the total package.