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Reputation Management for the Property Manager

Reputation Management for the Property Manager

Reputation management is especially important for the property manager, as many potential tenants/residents do their initial research online. Learn tips both offline and online to optimize your property’s reputation.

It is your job as the property manager to keep your residents and tenants happy. However, especially in today’s online environment, you may be doing all the right things, but it is inevitable that someone ends up unsatisfied and ensures that everyone else knows it. Whether a bad online review is warranted or not, it does not change the fact that it is now public information that anyone could find. This highlights why reputation management is such a priority for property managers. Your online presence represents you and the way you do business for those that may not have had previous interaction with you, so it is extremely important to tend to it.

See our free guide – The Tenant Experience: Avoid These 4 Common Mistakes >>

To follow are some reputation management tips for both off and online that the property manager can implement for best results.

Be worthy of great customer reviews

First and foremost, we’ll start with the most obvious. Reputation management starts with just that- your reputation. You’ll want to manage the type of property that your tenants and occupants will enjoy being in. Give them minimal opportunities to complain. Some of the top areas to prioritize include:

Of course, for this blog post’s purposes, these robust areas of importance have been simplified. It is, however, important that we mention them as a reminder that reputation management does begin with the quality of your property.

Maintain your online presence

When you think of reputation management, you likely think of responding to reviews. Don’t get us wrong, this is a HUGE part of it, and we’ll get to that next. However, truly great reputation management involves some proactive steps as well. Whether it be on your website, your social media profiles, or both, it is a great idea to keep visitors and followers updated on the efforts that you are regularly carrying out in order to make your property a safer, cleaner, more entertaining or more enjoyable space. This is especially important if you know there are some areas of improvement that you need to work on, whether or not you have actually received a negative review. Why? This will show both current and prospective residents/tenants that their happiness is ALWAYS a priority, not just when you are publicly shamed via a review for doing something wrong. It communicates that you want to fix issues BEFORE they become a problem for others. The proactiveness communicated through these types of posts is something that would be attractive to anyone.

Actively manage and respond to reviews

In order to not only to present yourself in a good light to the public, but also to get the most out of the reviews that you receive on a professional level, it is important that you take the time to read and respond to all reviews that you receive, both positive and negative.

Why read through? It is important to carefully read through all posts and truly understand what message the reviewer is trying to convey because it can truly potentially help you find areas of improvement or areas in which you are already excelling and take action based on what you learn. It will also allow you to provide the most effective, understanding response.

Why respond to positive reviews? You want to let positive reviewers know that you appreciate them taking their time to share positive things about you and encourage them to spread the word.

Why respond to negative reviews? You want to let the reviewer know that they are heard and that you want to improve their experience. Onlookers should also be aware that you work to improve any negative aspects of your business that are brought to your attention.

Responding publicly vs. privately: While we did mention that best practice is to respond to all reviews, the way in which you respond does not always need to be public. As far as knowing when to do which, Updater recommends the following:

Respond publicly:

  • Positive reviews: If you’ve interacted with the resident/tenant personally and can add personalized and specific talking points to the review to show that you remember them.
  • Negative reviews:
    • If there is a legitimate issue, leave a public comment that lets the reviewer know that you will reach out to them individually in order to help solve the issue.
    • If there are any sort of miscommunications about the property’s expectations and/or policies, it is best to leave a comment back in order to clarify any incorrect information. It is important to remain understanding and level-headed without seeming too defensive.

Respond privately:

  • Positive reviews: If you receive a positive review from someone you may not have interacted with personally or don’t have any specific personal touches to add to a response message, reach out to them privately. Simply thank them for taking the time to give you such great feedback.
  • Negative reviews: If a reviewer leaves a rant-like review or even a review with totally false information, it is recommended that you reach out to the reviewer privately first so that you can find out more about the situation. At this point, once attempts have been made to speak to the person privately, you may leave a public response noting that you have reached out to the reviewer in order to best understand the situation and see what you can do about it. By responding privately first, this relays the amount of care that you place on this type of issue and your seriousness about correcting any problems.

You can maintain your property in a favorable light by simply. following these basic property manager reputation management tips. For more information on how Kings III can help keep your property safe, visit www.kingsiii.com.

The Tenant Experience: Avoid These 4 Common Mistakes

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